Super Simple Broth Fondue Recipe for Anyone

Super Simple Broth Fondue Recipe for Anyone

Chicken Taco Ingredients

Super Simple Broth Fondue Recipe for Anyone

This post may contain affiliate links and I may earn a small commission when you click on the links at no additional cost to you. I only recommend products I would use myself and all opinions expressed here are my own. Read my full privacy policy here.

What is Broth Fondue

Broth fondue is a wonderful meal for so many reasons. It’s healthy. It can be cheap. It makes for a fun and relaxing date night. The list goes on. We got a fondue set as a wedding gift and we use it almost every week.

When most people hear fondue, wonderful cheesy goodness might be the first thing that comes to mind. Or perhaps it’s melted chocolate for marshmallows and strawberries? Now I love both chocolate and cheese, but I can’t eat that every week and still lose weight.

Broth fondue is different. It’s basically hotpot with a western-style broth. You can make this in either a fondue pot or a hot pot setup.

How I Make it Easy

We normally have fondue on Sunday nights as a way to relax after meal prepping. As we meal prep our food for the week, we set a little aside for fondue later that day.

When we chop veggies, a handful of everything ends up in a bowl for fondue later (onions, zucchini, etc.).  When we bake potatoes for later in the week, we pre-cook some for the fondue pot. As we portion and cut chicken, we cut up some for fondue.

The chicken we will start in a marinade, so it has a few hours to gain some extra flavor. But we make sure to keep it simple, like barbeque sauce or balsamic vinegar with olive oil. Even the broth recipe is simple and uses premade chicken stock. We dress it up a bit with added seasonings, but for us fondue is about slowing down, relaxing, and enjoying each other’s company.

 

Three mild chicken tacos on a white plate on a wood table

My Fondue Pot

I would 100% recommend this pot. It’s been perfect for everything from date night to Thanksgiving dessert. There are so many things to like about this pot. It’s nonstick. It’s the perfect size for a 32 oz box of broth.  It’s COMPLETELY dishwasher safe. That’s right, I unplug the pot, put the whole thing in the dishwasher, and it cleans beautifully.

I also really like the temperature settings. The lower values have been great for things like chocolate. We normally keep it around a 5 for broth. I think the higher settings are for oil.

The forks it comes with are nice too (and also dishwasher safe). We also got a set of hot pot strainer scoops, which are great for foods that don’t like to stick on forks. They are also great for scooping out foods that fall off of forks.

Substitutions

Garlic

We really like garlic and usually use minced garlic. I could crush an entire head’s worth of cloves, but I personally think that’s a lot of work. You might be able to substitute for garlic powder, but I don’t recommend it.

Worcestershire

We use the real stuff that’s fermented and not the generic stuff because the real stuff is soy-free. You could also substitute with soy sauce or straight salt. But we like the flavor of the Worcestershire.

Spices

You can change these to fit your taste. But remember that broth for fondue needs to be much stronger than a normal soup so the dippers actually get some of the flavor.

Chicken Taco Ingredients

Dippers

Everyone’s favorite fondue topic. There are dippers to suit every pallet and then some.  I recommend you have a little bit of protein, starch, and veggies.

Protein

Thinly sliced beef is a family favorite, but also a sometimes food. Chicken sausage is another favorite. Marinated chicken is a regular for our fondue pot. But there are a ton of options fish, turkey, pork, squid, shellfish. Tofu is delicious for those out there who can eat soy, but I don’t have any experience cooking with it.

Whatever you decide to use, make sure you slice it nice and thin, so it cooks quickly. Also, for meat like beef and chicken, I recommend that you at least salt it a little ahead of time.

Sliced apple and rolling pin

Starches

These are also delicious. You can have starches like baby corn and potatoes. We pre-bake potatoes because we think they taste better, and we lack patience. Then they reheat and get some more flavor in the broth. We cut, and then bake on a greased cookie sheet at 450°F for 30 min and then put them away until fondue time. I recommend russets. Then yellow potatoes are okay. And red are our least favorite. Or you can just have a side of rice, which is also yummy.

Veggies

Go to town. There are so many to choose from I’m not able to list them all if I tried. But a few I like are onions, zucchini, carrots, mushrooms, and peppers. Whichever you choose, make sure you slice it thinly if you want it fully cooked. Or you can cook it a bit ahead of time. If you like them on the raw side (or don’t care so much), then slice them a bit thicker. I like my carrots a bit on the raw side too.

Literally, whatever you a prepping this week. You can set aside a handful for fondue. That way you will have variety without needing to acquire awkwardly small portions of many different things.

Sliced apple and rolling pin

Detailed Directions

As usual, wash your hands and wipe down your counters before you get started. I know most of the cooking will happen during the meal at the table this time, but I think it’s a healthy habit. Also, I always start in my kitchen.

Fondue pot with the first four ingredients on a white cutting board.

I put all the little things into the pot first: garlic, Worcestershire, bay leaves, and black pepper. Then I carry the pot to the table and pour the carton of stock in there. This prevents spilling. I set it to simmer (5 on my pot) and start setting the table.

For fondue, there are always lots of little things to put out. There are the table settings, with the extra forks and baskets. Then the dippers, sauces, and refill pitcher. By the time everything has reached the table, the broth is boiling and all we have to do is sit down and enjoy.

If the pot gets low during your meal, top it off with the water. If you are worried that you won’t know when your food is cooked, just bring the meat thermometer to the table. We did. The chicken cubes took longer than we were initially expecting, but the beef took a whole lot less.

When we’re finished, the broth goes down the garbage disposal and the pot goes in the dishwasher along with all the little bowls.

Sliced apple and rolling pin

In The End

I would love to know what dippers you tried and how it went in the comments below. If you like this recipe and want a new one in your inbox every week, please subscribe to my email list below.

Broth Fondue

Broth Fondue

Broth fondue is a wonderful meal for so many reasons. Its healthy. It can be cheap. It makes for a fun and relaxing date night.
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Total Time 10 minutes
Course Main Course
Cuisine American
Servings 2
Calories 57 kcal

Equipment

  • Fondue Pot
  • Fondue Forks
  • Wire Strainers

Ingredients
  

  • 3 tablespoons Minced Garlic
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire Sauce
  • 1 teaspoon Bay Leaf
  • 1 teaspoon Black Pepper
  • 32 fl oz Chicken Broth
  • 1 Pitcher Water

Instructions
 

  • Put the first four ingredients in the pot.
    Fondue pot with the first four ingredients on a white cutting board.
  • Bring pot to the table.
  • Pour in chicken broth.
  • Bring to simmer.
  • Enjoy as you cook your dippers through dinner.
Keyword Dinner
Kitchen Contingencies: How to Prepare for the Unexpected

Kitchen Contingencies: How to Prepare for the Unexpected

Kitchen Contingencies: How to Prepare for the Unexpected

This post may contain affiliate links and I may earn a small commission when you click on the links at no additional cost to you. I only recommend products I would use myself and all opinions expressed here are my own. Read my full privacy policy here.

How to prepare your kitchen for the unexpected, like burning dinner or getting sick.

Nothing Ever Goes Wrong

No really, nothing ever goes wrong in my kitchen, except, you know, on days ending in y.

Life happens and I’ve found it’s best to be prepared. Perhaps some of this sounds familiar to you? Your ingredients spontaneously grew mold in the fridge despite buying them yesterday. Your head is pounding so badly, you have equal chances of cutting your finger as a carrot. Your dinner burned.

You Get the Idea

It’s important to take the stress out of these events by controlling the chaos in your kitchen. Backups and redundancies can apply to your kitchen because eating is essential for you and your family. Hence why you are reading about advanced chaos management techniques for your kitchen.

If you are just getting started, check out my chaos management series starting with meal planning, and subscribe to my email list to get your chaos management worksheets.

Part of Your Meal is Ruined

My Most Common Reason

The number one reason I run into this problem is that food sometimes goes bad before its expiration date. Now I’m not going to claim that I have the best luck. But I don’t think food going bad before its time is that unusual.

I’ve precut potatoes and had them grow mold in my fridge in less than 24 hours. Then there are the bags of lettuce, where the leaves become slimy a week before the printed date. Or the “fresh” package of chicken that when you open it smells like a nightmare’s gym socks.

Vanilla Beans bound with twine

Need a Side

Sides can be fairly simple to replace if you keep your kitchen well stocked. The first place I always start is by looking at the produce I bought for snacking. I normally have a little more than I really need. A pile of baby carrots or sliced cucumber can be a healthy replacement any night of the week. Also, there’s no rule saying that the salmon you were going to serve with asparagus won’t go well with a sliced apple.

Then there are dry goods, which in my apartment tend to be starches. Pasta only takes 15 minutes after the water boils. If you have a bit of extra time, rice in the miraculous rice cooker goes with so many dishes. (I love things that cook perfectly without my assistance or supervision.)

You might want to store something yummy in the freezer. Everything from frozen green beans to dinner rolls could be strategically placed in there just waiting for when you need them.

There are also many prepackaged side dishes that have a long shelf life, like instant mashed potatoes. These don’t take up a ton of shelf space, which can be a necessity. However, I don’t buy these because of our food restrictions. But they could work very well for your family.

Hands with pink dish washing gloves, sponge, and a soap bottle

You Need to Replace the Main Dish

I love my freezer for these situations. There are so many wonderful foods you can stash away for a rainy day in here. I’m a big fan of frozen filets, like salmon or steak. My mom always has a package of hot dogs in hers for just in case.

Canned goods are an alternative, but I don’t like them as much. You can keep a can or two of anything from soup to chef Boyardee ravioli.

Then there is always boxed mac and cheese and instant ramen. Since I set these aside as an “in case of emergency food”, and not as part of my regular meal rotation, I’m not too concerned about how healthy they are. Just that there are no allergies. The nice thing about these foods is they can sit in the back of a cupboard for a long time. The bad thing is you can forget to check their expiration dates.

Your Entire Meal is Ruined

Dinner is Burned

Is your dinner more cinder than food? Take a deep breath, you’re going to be okay. After the smoke clears, literally, it’s okay to have a snack while you mentally regroup. Personally, I find that a snack is better than picking a fight or breaking out into tears.

Let’s say, theoretically, your dinner is now completely inedible. I’m sure you never burn food, but I will admit to it happening on occasion. Cooking can be a learning process for everyone. The first time my husband grilled skin-on chicken thighs, they literally caught on fire. I’ve burned everything from microwave popcorn to chicken breasts.

I’m not going to admit to eating my half-burned kitchen mishaps. This has not totally happened more than twice or anything already this year. But you can only do that if at least some of your meal is intact.

Entire Backup Meals

For breakfast, this can be as easy as deciding to have toast instead of eggs. Or keeping some oatmeal in the cupboard and microwaving it.

Lunch or dinner can be harder to replace. For my household of two humans, I like these meals to make enough for 2-4 servings and to have 2-3 of these backups on hand at any time. The larger meals are so I can still have my regularly scheduled leftover lunches if I need them during the week. Having more than one meal stored gives both the extra backup for a really terrible week and the ability to choose what you are in the mood for after dealing with smoke.

The Freezer is Your Friend

I’ll be honest, we like to always have a frozen pizza in our freezer just in case. For healthier weeknights, I love keeping a dump recipe or two in my freezer at any given time. When I make one for my scheduled meal plan, I’ll make an extra one just to keep in the freezer. I might plan to eat it in a few weeks, but I sleep easier knowing that it’s there just in case.

On Your Shelves

Boxes and cans can also be helpful. These tend to look like just combining the replacing a side and replacing your main dish sections above. Box mac and cheese with frozen green beans. Salmon filet on rice with an apple.

Sliced apple and rolling pin

You Can’t Cook

Perhaps, your head is pounding so badly, you have equal chances of cutting your fingers as a carrot. Or maybe your schedule is making crazy demands on your time.

Be it stress, illness, or even illness caused by stress sometimes your body demands that you take a day off. I try to listen to mine when it starts yelling like that. But as usual, I had to learn the hard way. I cut my fingertip off with a mandolin while having a migraine once. It’s not an experience I would recommend.

You Still Have Options

Premade and pre-prepped food can be great in this circumstance. Sometimes all I can do is preheat the oven and then go lay down. Then my husband will pop a frozen pizza in the fridge for us. Or he’ll just get takeout.

Worst case, you can order in. Delivery isn’t sin, but I still try to avoid it when I can. Just make sure you take care of yourself. You are important.

Overall

Life will keep throwing us curve balls and we can try to be ready for them. Even if you burn dinner, you can still make sure that there’s food on the table. Setting aside a little now can save you a frantic headache in the future. Your future self will thank you. I would love to know some of your unexpected food stories in the comments below.

If you found this helpful, please subscribe to my email list and get new chaos management techniques every week.

Mild Instant Pot Chicken Tacos

Mild Instant Pot Chicken Tacos

Chicken Taco Ingredients

Mild Instant Pot Chicken Tacos

This post may contain affiliate links and I may earn a small commission when you click on the links at no additional cost to you. I only recommend products I would use myself and all opinions expressed here are my own. Read my full privacy policy here.

I Love Tacos

I insist on having tacos once a week because I love them, even the mild ones. Then I love the leftover taco meat for salads, quesadillas, and breakfast burritos. These mild chicken tacos in the instant pot are a super easy recipe to set it and forget it. It still has substantial flavor but is mild enough for a more sensitive pallet. It also pairs well with all the salsas and hot sauces I’ve tried if you like them spicier.

Spiciness

I love the heat, but my husband can’t take too much kick. If you can’t take the heat use a bell pepper and leave out the cayenne. If you use a deseeded jalapeno, you’ll still get the flavor, but you’ll need hot sauce to actually make it spicy. I’ve also tried this recipe with 3 serrano peppers and thought it had a pleasant kick. But it was a bit too much for my husband.

 

Three mild chicken tacos on a white plate on a wood table

Substitutions

Onions

I tend to get either a white or a yellow onion depending on what looks best while I’m shopping. I wouldn’t try a red one with this recipe.

Peppers

There are a lot of many wonderful peppers out there. If you can’t take any heat whatsoever, you can use a sweet pepper, like a bell pepper. I like to use a larger deseeded jalapeno for flavor but without the spiciness. A poblano or Anaheim pepper will also give flavor, without too much heat if you can find them. I’ve tried this recipe with three serrano peppers, thinking that with two pounds of chicken, it wouldn’t be too spicy for my husband. He survived. But I’m not making that mistake again.

Chicken

I prefer the tenderloins for both taste and cholesterol reasons. My second favorite choice is chicken breasts, but it just doesn’t taste as tender. You can use boneless skinless chicken thighs, but I personally don’t think it’s worth it. They give a fattier taste that I don’t enjoy, but you will still get tacos. Which is a much better place, than dinner without tacos.

Chicken Stock

I’ve used both chicken stock and chicken broth. They both work. I like low-sodium if I can get it. If you don’t have either, just use some water. The important detail is that you have enough moisture, so it cooks correctly in the instant pot.

Fire Roasted Tomatoes with Garlic

The fire-roasted tomatoes with garlic are my favorite variety of canned tomato. The fire roasting really adds something to the overall flavor and color of every dish I’ve used it in. We are also big garlic fans, so more garlic in the tomatoes is a plus. You can use fire-roasted tomatoes without garlic and just add about 2 teaspoons of minced garlic for a very similar result.

If you can’t find the fire-roasted (which has happened to me) you can use diced tomatoes with the extra minced garlic. You won’t get the exact same flavor and color, but you will still have hot fresh taco meat.

Detailed Directions

I always recommend that you start every recipe by wiping down your counters and washing your hands, so you have a clean place to cook.

Chicken Taco Ingredients

For the onion and pepper, I just chop them in my food processor until they are chopped finely. I want them to mix so well with the shredded chicken that eating around them doesn’t come to mind. Make sure to chop them at least bite-sized if you prefer a chunky texture. Next, measure out the rest of your ingredients and throw them into your instant pot.

Sliced apple and rolling pin

Then set your instant pot to cook on high for 15 minutes. When it’s done allow for a natural release of 10 minutes, before carefully venting your pot. Finally, shred and eat!

Potatoes cooking in oven

Recipe Notes

If you want to halve the recipe, you will need to adjust the cooking time to 8 minutes. Keep the 10-minute natural release. If you depressurize too quickly, you’ll suck the water out of the chicken, and it will taste dry.

This taco meat keeps well in the fridge and makes for excellent leftovers. I think it still tastes good 5 days after cooking. Because it uses two pounds of meat, I make it with leftovers in mind.

What you can prepare ahead of time

  1. Pre-chop your onion and pepper
  2. Pre-portion your chicken in a ziplock
  3. Pre-mix all spices and put in a container
  4. Then the night off, you just dump your chicken, veggies, spices, chicken stock, and can of tomatoes in and you only need to measure one thing, the chicken stock.
3 Chicken Tacos on a Plate

Mild Chicken Tacos

These mild chicken tacos in the instant pot are a super easy recipe to set it and forget it for 8 servings of taco meat.
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 35 minutes
Total Time 45 minutes
Course Main Course
Cuisine American
Servings 8
Calories 173 kcal

Equipment

  • Instant Pot

Ingredients
  

  • 2 pounds Chicken Tenderloin
  • 1 Onion white or yellow
  • 1 Pepper Jalapeno
  • 0.5 cup Chicken Stock
  • 1 15 oz can Fire-roasted Tomatoes with Garlic
  • 1 tablespoon Chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon Kosher Salt
  • 1 teaspoon Dried Oregano
  • 1 teaspoon Garlic Powder
  • 1 teaspoon Cayenne (optional)

Instructions
 

  • Chop Veggies.
  • Measure Ingredients.
    Chicken Taco Ingredients
  • Mix everything in the instant pot.
  • Cook on high for 15 min.
  • Natural release 10 min.
  • Vent carefully, to avoid gettingsteam in your face.
  • Shred chicken.
  • Serve and enjoy!

Notes

What you can prepare ahead of time
  1. Pre-chop your onion and pepper
  2. Pre-portion your chicken in a ziplock
  3. Pre-mix all spices and put in a container
  4. Then the night off, you just dump your chicken, veggies, spices, chicken stock, and can of tomatoes in and you only need to measure one thing, the chicken stock.
Keyword Chicken, Dinner, Weeknight
How to Buy in Bulk for a Small Kitchen

How to Buy in Bulk for a Small Kitchen

How to Buy in Bulk for a Small Kitchen

This post may contain affiliate links and I may earn a small commission when you click on the links at no additional cost to you. I only recommend products I would use myself and all opinions expressed here are my own. Read my full privacy policy here.

Buying in bulk can seem intimidating when it feels like you have no space. But you too can take advantage of buying things at a larger scale, even with a small kitchen.

A Bit About My Kitchen

Like you, I enjoy saving a bit of money and bulk buying when I can. I live in a 1 bedroom apartment with my husband and two dogs. All things considered, my kitchen is larger than what I would expect in a one-bedroom, but I wouldn’t call it large. I’ve had larger kitchens in college dorms. But it’s mine and right now all the appliances work, so I couldn’t ask for more. I might have big kitchen dreams, but I’m making my real kitchen work.

Two Ways I Bulk Buy

The first way is the standard large quantity method. Either just buy the larger bags, boxes, and packs. Or taking advantage of a nice sale, where I can buy six jars of my favorite tomato sauce.

The second way is to buy from the bulk sections at the local supermarket. You know where you scoop, bag, and weigh it yourself. Near me, my favorite store to do this at is Sprouts. It lets me buy 5 pounds of flour around the same per pound price as the 10-pound bags. This method also has the perk of only buying what I need and can store, while keeping my costs down.

Prioritize the Things You Can’t Run Out of

I always like having extra of important items. The saying “One is none. Two is one.” certainly applies to what I look to buy in bulk and goes well beyond toilet paper. These items absolutely deserve the extra shelf space. This list includes oatmeal, so I don’t start my day hangry, and dish soap, because it’s nightmare-inducing to imagine my kitchen without it.

Vanilla Beans bound with twine

My Favorites to Buy in Bulk

Small Things I use All the Time

I use vanilla extract every week. I can buy a 2 oz bottle for around $6 at my local grocery store or I can buy the 16 Fl oz bottles, which will save me at least $16 over the lifetime of that bottle. And vanilla extract keeps. This method doesn’t make sense if you won’t use it, but if you like to bake just go for it.

Yeast is another one. I like to buy a pound of yeast and store it in my fridge. Not only do I stop worrying about how many of those tiny packets I have left, but I frequently see savings over 50%. Even if I don’t use all the yeast before it dies, I still save money. During the pandemic, yeast prices fluctuated a lot, but the shortages appear to be over for now. I also don’t like worrying about running out of yeast for the bread machine.

Spices are another item I like to buy big. I only do this for the spices I use often, like garlic powder and chili powder. I’m on the fence about cinnamon, because it feels like I go through a lot on my morning oatmeal, but I know a half teaspoon a day isn’t that much.

Tea can also be fun to buy in bulk. It always feels like Christmas when a pound of tea arrives for me in the mail. I always try a few samples just for fun but stocking up on my favorites is essential because I drink tea all day every day.

Shelf-Stable Stuff

I love Sprouts the grocery store and one of my favorite sections is the bulk section. I can scoop out as much as I need for flour, sugar, oatmeal, etc. at prices comparable to the huge bags that aren’t going to fit in my kitchen.

Other shelf-stable favorites are things like chicken stock and tomato sauce. These items stay good for a very long time, but I use them regularly and worry about running out of them. So, I prefer to buy packs of several small jars or cartons instead of the huge jars because they keep better that way.

I could probably find the space for one of those 25-pound bags of starch if I was willing to commit to one type: potatoes, rice, or flour. I’ve had terrible luck with bags of potatoes. Perhaps my apartment is just too humid, but they always start sprouting within a week. Rice and flour go in storage containers, and I’ve never had an issue. There are plenty of containers that will hold such bags. The only ones large enough that I’ve tried are cleaned-out dog food containers, but it worked so well for flour I would recommend it.

Hands with pink dish washing gloves, sponge, and a soap bottle

Cleaning Products

These are always in constant demand in my kitchen. Because I cook every day, I always need to clean my kitchen (if only a little bit). I don’t want to even think about what I would do if I ran out of kitchen cleaning essentials.

I’ve carved out some oh-so-precious closet space for a huge thing of paper towels, which are essential for everything from microwaving leftovers to cleaning my counters. I always have at least one extra can of sprayway under my sink, which I use on a lot more than glass. It works surprisingly well on mystery countertop stickies.

Then there’s just soap. I love soap. I keep huge things of dish soap and hand soap under the sink and refill more manageable-sized containers for everyday use. I also keep large quantities of both dishwasher pods and rinse aid down there, because I run the dishwasher at least once a day.

Other Bulk Buys

These are just odds and ends that we use a lot of, like chocolate chips. Between cookies and waffles, we use chocolate chips about once a week. Somehow, I still stay in my calorie budget despite my proximity to a giant bag of chocolate.

We sometimes buy cheese in bulk. Hard cheese, like parmesan, can keep a long time in a ziplock in the fridge. Softer cheeses like mozzarella, we only buy if it’s been subdivided in the packaging. But we can afford the buffalo mozzarella that way.

Occasionally we also buy snack foods, but generally, we get the kind that’s already individually portioned, like chips. Microwave popcorn keeps pretty well too.

Chocolate Chips on Wooden Spoon

How to Store

For everyday dry good storage, I use 4 quart Cambro containers with these little oxo scoops to weigh out flour and sugar.  They are simple and do the job well. I use these for flour, sugar, and oatmeal, but you can use them for a lot of different ingredients, like rice and beans.

For my smaller storage needs, I have these Rubbermaid containers for rice, more flour varieties, and yeast. The one for yeast has been doing an excellent job keeping it fresh in my fridge.

If you are worried about spills, like me, shelf paper can feel like a necessity. I also have a label maker, which I use on most of my containers. Occasionally, I’ll write directly on something with a sharpie, but the labels always look nicer and bring me joy. Regardless, remember to label your containers. White powders look eerily similar to other white powders and even tan powders if your kitchen lights are as yellow as mine.

Things I Bought in Bulk and Probably Didn’t Need To

Sponges

The first thing that comes to mind is sponges. I have enough to last for years and now they take up valuable real estate under my sink.

Heavy-Duty Aluminum Foil

The next is a bulk pack of heavy-duty aluminum foil. I use this for almost everything that goes into my oven. But apparently, I don’t use as much as I think I do. I only go through a roll every 6 months or so.

Optimistic Snack Foods

But the number one thing I need to stop buying in bulk is optimistic snack foods. I am known to occasionally have these crazy ideas, like “We are going to be responsible and prep individual bags for the week.” and “There’s no way we would ever rapidly eat through the whole Costco sized thing in two days.” You can probably guess what happened from there.

This madness also occasionally reaches out for health food that I don’t really like. I’ve finally come to terms with the fact that I eat for pleasure and if it isn’t tasty, it’s probably not worth eating to me. So, I learned the hard way to stop buying healthy stuff I won’t eat. Buying extra isn’t going to persuade future me to like it more.

Potatoes

Part of this is that my eyes are bigger than my stomach (and calorie budget). I say we can go through five pounds of potatoes in two weeks, no problem. But I have yet to successfully store potatoes that long. Also, the two of us don’t go through that many potatoes.

In Conclusion

You can still buy in bulk if even if your kitchen is the size of a postage stamp. I have for many years in for several different apartments and you can too. What do you like to buy in bulk for your kitchen?

How to Bake Russet Potatoes the Easy Way

How to Bake Russet Potatoes the Easy Way

Baked potato on orange plate with fork

How to Bake Russet Potatoes the Easy Way

This post may contain affiliate links and I may earn a small commission when you click on the links at no additional cost to you. I only recommend products I would use myself and all opinions expressed here are my own. Read my full privacy policy here.

This recipe is how I make baked potatoes the easy way. I almost always use russets for that classic baked potato taste. These potatoes are crispy on the outside and flavorful on the inside, so they are tasty plain. Baked potatoes also keep really well in the fridge, so I can have this wonderful side even on a weeknight.

Baked Potatoes are Awesome

I get potato cravings from time to time, and I doubt I’m alone. One of the nice things about Noom is that I can eat potatoes and not feel bad about it later.

Baking is one of the healthiest ways to make potatoes. Potato’s bad health wrap has a lot to do with how Americans cook them (deep-fried), and the toppings people put on them (chili-cheese). But I think baked potatoes are a fairly healthy food.

What and When I Eat Them

Mostly, they are a healthy side for meat or fish. I love having shredded chicken on top of a hot baked potato. It’s so filling and not much fuss. Other ways I enjoy:

  • Classic butter: I try to limit my butter intake
  • Lemon Juice or Malt Vinegar: low calorie and very flavorful
  • Dry: Don’t feel like you have to put toppings on your potatoes. I certainly don’t.

Obviously, baked potatoes are good fresh. But I can keep these for 6-7 days in my fridge and they are still delicious out of the microwave. They are one of the few foods I trust to keep that long, which makes them a good meal prep food. The only trick is to put them in the fridge after they have cooled to room temperature.

Also, I like them when I’m sick and have to take a lot of pills. They are easy to reheat and agree with my meds.

Detailed Directions

Please remember to wash your hands and wipe down your counters before you start cooking. After that, I preheat my oven to 450°F. If your oven can’t handle such a high temperature, you can bake these at 425°F and get the same taste with longer cooking times. But I wouldn’t recommend anything much cooler.

Oven reading 450F

Next, get your potatoes out and really scrub them. Potatoes grow in dirt, and you probably don’t want to eat that. Even if you don’t like eating potato skins, you don’t dirt on your plate.

Clean potato on cutting board

Then take a fork or a sharp knife and stab up and down the sides of your potato 12-18 times, more if your potato is over 1 pound. You don’t have to stab very deep, just through the skin should be good.

Sliced apple and rolling pin

Then put them in the oven. I usually put mine directly on the oven rack. But they will still cook nicely on a cookie sheet. If you are using a cookie sheet, I recommend putting a little foil down, but you can skip the nonstick spray. Water will leave the potato and can make a small mess.

Potatoes cooking in oven

Bake until soft when you stab the center of the widest part of the potato. Most potatoes cook in about 45 minutes. For a potato 4 oz or less, I check at 30 minutes. Giant potatoes can take longer to cook. Also, you need to watch for cold spots in your oven, which are inconveniently potato-sized in my experience.

Baked potato on orange plate with fork

Recipe Notes

It’s difficult to overcook a baked potato, but very easy to undercook one. And no one wants an undercooked potato.  If you are unsure, give it another 15 minutes. In my experience, an extra 30 min probably won’t hurt its taste. Anything past that and it might start drying out, maybe.

Seriously though, don’t undercook your potatoes.

Plain Baked Potato

Easy Baked Potato

These potatoes are crispy on the outside and flavorful on the inside, so they are tasty plain. They also keep well in the fridge for up to a week.
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 45 minutes
Total Time 55 minutes
Course Side Dish
Cuisine American
Servings 1
Calories 179 kcal

Equipment

  • Oven
  • Fork
  • Cookie Sheet Optional

Ingredients
  

  • 1 Russet Potato About 8 ounces

Instructions
 

  • Preheat oven to 450°F.
    Oven reading 450F
  • Scrub potatoes.
    Clean potato on cutting board
  • Stab skin of potatoes all over with a fork.
  • Put in the oven either directly on the rack or a cookie sheet.
    Potatoes cooking in oven
  • Bake until soft in the center of the widest part of the potato. About 45 min for an 8-ounce potato.
  • Serve and enjoy!
    Plain Baked Potato
Keyword Dinner, Potato, Side